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by Anne W. Lupton · 13 comments

We welcome your feedback about SayNoToStigma.com. Please use the comment forms if you want to share your thoughts about a post or page. You can also e-mail us at saynotostigma@menninger.edu.

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{ 13 comments… read them below or add one }

Angie June 1, 2013 at 5:25 pm

I meant a post on your blog.

Angie June 1, 2013 at 5:23 pm

I’ve gone to several AA meetings only to be told that if I work the steps, I will no longer need any of my psychotropic medications. I find this to be a dangerous assumption by many people. With all of the dual diagnosis people you help, I assume there are many with strong opinions on this subject. Please consider doing a blog on the issue.

Thank you,

Me December 13, 2012 at 9:36 am

Unable to read the blog with the banner that follows you all the way down the page. It blocks most of the blog. Unable to close it. Makes the blog useless.

victoria bruner January 23, 2012 at 3:33 pm

For the last 10 years I have been a combat trauma therapist, researcher and program designer in the DoD. One of the most critical teaching points for our service members and their families is that PTS related to war zone experience is understandable. Therefore I developed an educational curriculum that began with information on the combat brain and body. My advice to our warriors was to tell folks that they had “autonomic nervous system reactivity syndrome” instead of PTSD. THey were not sick, crazy or disordered by experiencing a complex syndrome of body adaptation that was prolonged because it was survival based in combat. Many other clinicians now adopt this view. I do hope that a new term for the complex nature was war zone experience will be developed. Let me know if anyone would like a copy of my paper: The Battle Within: Understanding War Zone Physiology. BTW, I attended TMF in Topeka and have very fond memories of my time there. Victoria (Vicki Dewdney) Bruner

Rachel December 14, 2011 at 4:01 pm

I would just like to say that I was deeply touched by the Mark Harmon commentary on Bipolar Disorder. As a person who has suffered many years with being diagnosed and treated incorrectley I am relieved to know that maybe someone else will not have to go through what I went through. God bless you for your message
RK

Jorge November 3, 2011 at 6:37 pm

I just received and read my e-Menninger Connection. I like it better than the hard copy. The blog “SayNoToStigma” note led me to immediately open it as I have harbored and expressed thoughts about “the stigma of mental illness” for a number of years. I maintain that if Karl Menninger remained active today he would have led the way to discontinue the use of “stigma” on or near any sentence containing any mention of mental illness.
My points: 1. That word has become nearly synonymous with serious emotional/mental problems. This to the point that it has lost its usefulness.
2. When I have mentioned this to some of my trusted peers they either see no problem, think its use is too imbedded to change and/or suggest I have my head examined.
3. While awaiting this sea-change may we all consider replacing this worn out word with one of the following:
condemnating
debased
degradation
disgrace
ignominy
loss of face
put down
Shame
taint
Thanks for this blog.
R. Larry Schmitt, M.D. (P ’65, C’67)

+1

Shelly Miller August 16, 2011 at 8:57 am

Why make people with Mental Illness feel worse about themselves b/c they have been labelled w/ a stigma? They, like any individual w/ any illness, need encouragement, love, acceptance, nonjudgemental comments, and role models that have “walked the walk”. No Dr. can totally understand Mental Illness unless they have been through it themselves and have empathy and understanding.

Blanche Muroff January 7, 2011 at 2:19 pm

Would the archives of the Menninger clinic or foundation be interested in acquiring the words and music of the Freudian Follies of 1950,1951,1952. They are really priceless. Blanche Muroff

Ella October 29, 2010 at 8:55 pm

Thank you Dr. Schmitt! We Bi-Polars who live this every day have heard all the words, certainly; stigma does still exist no matter how we label it. Please tell your “trusted” peer to have his own head examined, to forget semantics and Roget, screw the imbeddedness theory and to concentrate on providing a real solution for a real problem. Besides, the word “stigma” is not nearly large or meangful enough to describe in two syllables what it is we “mentally ill” people experience thanks to the public lack of education on the subject. Get the message out there that some of us are different, like the kids who wear glasses, the friend with one leg, the man with a burned face, the neighbor with Bell’s Paulsey, et al. Tks.

Paul Fulks ThD September 30, 2010 at 9:44 am

Thanks for a great blog. I have followed posts with interest. Recently, a friend told me he heard Rosalyn Carter say something to the effect that mental health stigma is a thing of the past. This blog is valuable in keeping this issue in perspective.

Many thanks,
Paul Fulks, ThD. LMFT

Elizabeth March 20, 2010 at 2:53 pm

I am a graduate student who was just informed that she had said the word “trauma” too much when discussing her (PTSD) cases in supervision. For this, I am said to be in danger of transference occurring with clients, and am about to be held out of continuing into internship and, it seems, referred for a period of “re-education.”

This, in apparent disregard of the fact that no evidence nor complaints have been made, no disclosures made either to clients, no disclosure of personal trauma details in supervision class, and that the practicum site wants me back.

Regardless of my exemplary record as a student, and of my (expert trauma) clinician’s hearty approval of my choice of career and progress in it, can this be due to the fact that it is known that I am a trauma recoveree?

I had hoped we were past that at university level.

Apparently I spoke too soon.

Is anyone brave enough to help me know what to do?

Certainly, an angry or nervous recoveree attempting to make a case for her work being viewed as progressive and best practice in a university whose curriculum includes not a paragraph on current trauma issues, and by a visiting supervisor with experience limited to a small, conservative Christian college, risks simply being seen as a poster-child for stigma, thus sealing her own fate, poor thing.

Sigh.

Anyone?

Meg Krause March 16, 2010 at 8:13 am

Congratulations on SayNoToStigma.com, what a fantastic resource!

I wanted to introduce you to another anti-stigma campaign, specifically aimed at employers. AmericasHeroesAtWork.gov is a US Department of Labor anti-stigma campaign that educates employers about Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in the workplace. While not specific to Veterans and Service Members, the stigmas surrounding these signature invisible wounds of war present a common barrier to employment for today’s military men and women transitioning into the civilian workforce. Our goal is to help eliminate these stigmas throughout the employment sector through education.

The Web site provides free educational materials for hiring managers, HR representatives, employee assistance professionals and supervisors to learn about mental health stigma and how to educate their workplace. Materials are presented in the form of fact sheets, frequently asked questions and an interactive training tool covering issues such as ADA compliance, accommodations, effective communication and best management practices.

We hope you find it to be a valuable tool in your efforts.
Meg Krause – US Army Veteran
On behalf of the US Department of Labor’s America’s Heroes at Work team

Larry Schmitt, M.D. December 31, 2009 at 2:01 pm

I just received and read my e-Menninger Connection. I like it better than the hard copy. The blog “SayNoToStigma” note led me to immediately open it as I have harbored and expressed thoughts about “the stigma of mental illness” for a number of years. I maintain that if Karl Menninger remained active today he would have led the way to discontinue the use of “stigma” on or near any sentence containing any mention of mental illness.
My points: 1. That word has become nearly synonymous with serious emotional/mental problems. This to the point that it has lost its usefulness.
2. When I have mentioned this to some of my trusted peers they either see no problem, think its use is too imbedded to change and/or suggest I have my head examined.
3. While awaiting this sea-change may we all consider replacing this worn out word with one of the following:
condemnating
debased
degradation
disgrace
ignominy
loss of face
put down
Shame
taint
Thanks for this blog.
R. Larry Schmitt, M.D. (P ’65, C’67)

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